April 9th, 2014

Hello! Would it be OK to send you over an interactive geography quiz at all? Cheers, Jack
Asketh - inspirationalmusicblog

Feel free :) What would you like me to do with it?

January 30th, 2014

Tectonics; Darwinism at its most brutal.

When you think about in a certain way, tectonics are the creators and destroyers of life that humans have been philosophising, debating and killing each other over for centuries.

Obviously there’s the whole sea floor spreading makes new land shizz, which is awesome in it’s own right but it’s not what I’m talking about in this ramble. What I’m talking about is the inherent power that tectonics have over the evolution of life on this planet.¬†From continents smashing into each other, to super-volcanoes erupting , tectonics have been the cause of, or at least played a significant part in nearly every mass extinction that we know of and are one of the main reasons why the planets climate changes so damn much. I’m going to sort this into direct and indirect effects, stay tuned - the indirect are the exciting ones.

Basically from the continents moving around everything gets messed up. Firstly, horizontal tectonics change the latitude and longitude of continents. Most problematically, this means that various ocean gateways open and shut, meaning that all those nice ocean currents we depend on for our (fairly) pleasant European summers are nowhere to be seen. Secondly, it also affects which continents are in polar regions (and as previously mentioned which do/do not get warmed by ocean currents) and hence affects how much ice there is. Okay, ice? So what? Basically less ice = higher sea level, as less of the world’s water is stored in ice. Higher sea levels can be really good for evolution as shallow seas that form on continental shelves are some of the most biodiverse areas ever but also really bad for little terrestrial guys, like us. Either way, very important.

Vertical tectonics is a whole other mess. So when the plates smash into each other and make new mountains (orogeny!) this completely changes atmospheric circulations and the hydrological cycle. Where there are new mountains, they suck air upward like a huge vacuum, it rises and cools, taking in water and making lots of rain. The entire reason the South East Asian monsoon season exists is because of the Himalayas doing this, for some context. Where the mountains spring up controls what areas will be getting a lot of rain and which will become very arid - again very important if you happen to be living there.

The indirect effects of tectonics are where it gets juicy. So you have super volcanoes, like Yellowstone which spew a shit-tonne of ash, dust and nasty gases into the stratosphere. The stratosphere isn’t very good at cleaning up after this happens and basically can only use whatever water got shot into it with the rest of the volcanic mess to wash it out. This means a global temperature drop of over 15 degrees for about 10-15 years while the planet sorts itself out. This could easily wipe out a whole bunch of species who weren’t able to adapt. This is what some scientists think happened to the dinosaurs after a comet smashed into Mexico and set off all the volcanoes.¬†

Although we can’t really be definitively sure what exactly caused each mass extinction - it’s pretty clear tectonics had their part to play. The Permian Mass Extinction killed 96% OF LIFE ON EARTH. Everything alive today is descended from that surviving 4%, which is pretty amazing. Even without the volcanism, the constant changing of climate throughout time has been a huge driver of evolution as the selection pressures have changed from barren super continents, to floating tropical islands in shallow seas, to world as we know it today.Tectonics aren’t a petty god though, they don’t pick and choose who lives and dies, they just screw stuff up and say “survival of the fittest, bitches”.

allthingsgeography:

The geography of Internet domains

allthingsgeography:

The geography of Internet domains

January 8th, 2014

allthingsgeography:

Video on evolution

September 16th, 2013

Hello, can I have an odd request? In which I'd show you an outline of a map I patched together and you'd tell me if it's sort of geographically-evolutiony possible, pretty please? I wouldn't bother you, normally, it's just been bugging me a lot.. and if so, what kind of a climate and weather would it have? Thank you, even if you say no :)
Asketh - thespookyscienceofficer

Sorry for the incredibly slow response. If you still want me to do it I’m more than happy to have a shot at it. I’ve done similar things for writer friends in the past :3

Wow this blog is amazing! It really makes me happy to see your passion for geography and your love for the earth :) I've noticed that this blog hasn't really been active in a while but I hope there are new things to be posted soon! Usually I feel quite lonely in terms of my passion for geography because it isn't really shared with many, but when I come across people like you it's a really great feeling! Love this blog, keep it up :)
Asketh - Anonymous

Thank you so much :D I’m glad I’m not alone. Yeah, I know I haven’t been active for agggeeeesss and I feel terrible about it. I’ve been on a gap year and have had no time for blogging. However, I’m starting uni next week so I’m sure I’ll get back into it with all the new geography I’ll be learning. Thanks again for the support :)

Hi, I was wondering what was your favourite module?
Asketh - Anonymous

Probably Plate Tectonics or Ecosystems :3

October 1st, 2012
September 28th, 2012
sarahkateyall:

athankyou:

baby alpaca

this is true love

sarahkateyall:

athankyou:

baby alpaca

this is true love

(via moogleterra)

September 26th, 2012

don't suppose you know why the calculation of hydraulic radius is an important part of a stream study?
Asketh - Anonymous

Well the hydraulic radius is basically to do with how efficiently water is able to move along the channel. So basically, a big hydraulic radius = a more efficient river. This is important when you’re thinking about the flood risk of a river, because if it’s better at moving water a long it’s less likely to flood. So that’s probably why it’s an important part of a stream study :3